Wednesday, October 27, 2010

079. October Update; incl. Egypt, Nigeria

Religious Liberty Prayer Bulletin | RLPB 079 | Wed 27 Oct 2010

WELCOME to the intercessors who have joined the list this month.

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So now, O LORD our God, save us from [their hands], that all the kingdoms of the earth may know that you alone are the LORD. (Hezekiah's prayer -- Isaiah 37:20 ESV.)

OCTOBER 2010 UPDATE -- During October we prayed concerning . . .

ALGERIA, where the government appears to have traded religious liberty for 'peace' with Islamic militants. The persecution is targeting the less Arabised, less Islamised, mostly Berber, Kabylie region east of Algiers.

* UPDATE: On 5 October 2010, Christians Hocine Hocini (44) and Salem Fellak (34) were acquitted of the charge of violating Ramadan (RLPB 075). However, on 18 October the same court fined a 27-year-old Muslim man 100,000 dinars and sentenced him to two years in prison for 'breaching a precept of Islam' by violating Ramadan and eating during daylight hours. Nine others caught breaking the Ramadan fast will face court in Akbou on 8 November. As noted in RLPB 076, the trial of Pastor Yahou Mahmoud and three elders charged with 'practising non-Muslim worship without government authorisation' has been postponed to 28 November. False charges of 'swindling' still loom over Ali Arhab, the Algerian-born, France-based director of Channel North Africa (gospel satellite TV).


CENTRAL ASIA, where the Church is suffering escalating persecution from local Muslims who reject Christianity as foreign and non-traditional as well as from authoritarian administrations that denounce Protestant Christianity as a threat to social cohesion and harmony.

* UPDATE: On 21 October Protestant Pastor Ilmurad Nurliev, who had been falsely accused of 'swindling' more than US$2.4 million from church members (despite Turkmenistan being one of the poorest countries in the world -- see RLPB 072) was convicted and jailed for four years. Forum 18 reports: 'Judge Agajan Akjaev of Mary Town Court in south-eastern Turkmenistan ruled that Nurliev will serve his sentence in the general regime labour camp in Seydi.' The court also ordered that Pastor Nurliev undergo forced treatment for an alleged drug addiction. As Forum 18 notes, reports indicate that prisoners at the Seydi camp are routinely 'treated' with psychotropic (mind- altering) drugs. An American diplomat who travelled from the capital, Ashgabat, to Mary to observe the trial was refused entry. As noted in RLPB 072, the religious liberty situation in Turkmenistan has deteriorated dramatically.


OCTOBER 2010 ROUND-UP -- also this month . . .

* EGYPT: SERIOUS INCITEMENT AGAINST COPTIC CHRISTIANS ESCALATES

Persecution is escalating against Egypt's Christians -- particularly the indigenous (non-Arab) Copts -- as the government implements Sharia provisions that prohibit Christians from testifying against Muslims, enabling radicalised Muslims to assault, rob and even kill Christians with impunity. In May 2010 Youssef Ibrahim (a New York Sun reporter) claimed President Mubarak had brokered a quid pro quo deal with the Muslim Brotherhood: they would accept dynastic succession of power to Mubarak's son, Gamal, in exchange for freedom to advance Sharia (Islamic law) as well as restore over the Copts the rules of dhimmitude (i.e. accept subjugation or face jihad).

On 15 September Muhammad Salim al-Awwa, former secretary-general of the International Union for Muslim Scholars, raged against Egypt's minority Copts on Aljazeera TV, falsely accusing them of planning a coup against the Muslims. He claimed the Copts were importing weapons from Israel which were being stockpiled in churches. Equally ridiculous was his claim that Egypt's security forces are unable to gain access to churches and monasteries to investigate. At the same time, Islamic inciters are spreading rumours that the Coptic Church is kidnapping converts to Islam and whisking them away to desert monasteries where they are tortured back to Christianity -- the exact opposite of what actually happens. (Muslim converts to Christianity have been kidnapped and tortured to revert.)

Muslims have staged at least ten mass demonstrations since September with calls to massacre the Copts. Muslim demonstrators burned an effigy of Coptic Pope Shenouda (86) on 8 October while chanting, 'Shenouda, just wait, we will dig your grave with our own hands.' As incitement escalates and genocidal violence looms, the government of President Hosni Mubarak remains totally silent. The situation is extremely dangerous. Please pray for God to intervene, drawing the Copts into prayerful dependence and then answering their prayers for the glory of his own holy name. (Isaiah 37:20.)

* NIGERIA: AL-QAEDA SUPPORTS BOKO HARAM EXPANSION

According to terrorism analyst Yossef Bodansky (Strategic Policy 8, 2010), in mid June 2010 Boko Haram ('the Nigerian Taliban') formalised its links with al-Qaeda of the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM). Bodansky also reported that AQIM is receiving aid and intelligence from Sudan and Iran 'who are operating jointly in the Sahel'. AQIM leader Abu Mousab Abdel Wadoud asserts that the international jihadist movement will assist Boko Haram with weapons and training to enable al-Qaeda to gain 'strategic depth' in sub-Saharan Africa and the solid foothold in Nigeria required for operations in West Africa.

Boko Haram jihadists attacked a federal prison in Bauchi in September 2010, freeing about 750 inmates, including numerous imprisoned sect members. A spate of attacks over recent weeks, targeting police officers, politicians and traditional leaders in the city of Maiduguri, has forced Nigerian security forces to escalate their efforts against Boko Haram. On Sunday 24 October, Boko Haram jihadists attacked the police station in the town of Bara in the northern state of Yobe. The AQIM link could lead to the emergence of 'spectacular terrorism' al-Qaeda-style -- such as suicide-bombings -- hitherto unknown in Nigeria. Boko Haram has been behind most outbreaks of mass violence against Christians in the north since 2004. Please pray for the Church in Nigeria as Boko Haram's new relationship with AQIM does not bode well.

079. October Update; Incl. Egypt, Nigeria

Religious Liberty Prayer Bulletin | RLPB 079 | Wed 27 Oct 2010

So now, O LORD our God, save us from [their hands], that all the kingdoms of the earth may know that you alone are the LORD. (Hezekiah's prayer -- Isaiah 37:20 ESV.)

OCTOBER 2010 UPDATE -- During October we prayed concerning . . .

ALGERIA
, where the government appears to have traded religious liberty for 'peace' with Islamic militants. The persecution is targeting the less Arabised, less Islamised, mostly Berber, Kabylie region east of Algiers.

* UPDATE: On 5 October 2010, Christians Hocine Hocini (44) and Salem Fellak (34) were acquitted of the charge of violating Ramadan (RLPB 075). However, on 18 October the same court fined a 27-year-old Muslim man 100,000 dinars and sentenced him to two years in prison for 'breaching a precept of Islam' by violating Ramadan and eating during daylight hours. Nine others caught breaking the Ramadan fast will face court in Akbou on 8 November. As noted in RLPB 076, the trial of Pastor Yahou Mahmoud and three elders charged with 'practising non-Muslim worship without government authorisation' has been postponed to 28 November. False charges of 'swindling' still loom over Ali Arhab, the Algerian-born, France-based director of Channel North Africa (gospel satellite TV).

CENTRAL ASIA,
where the Church is suffering escalating persecution from local Muslims who reject Christianity as foreign and non-traditional as well as from authoritarian administrations that denounce Protestant Christianity as a threat to social cohesion and harmony.

* UPDATE: On 21 October Protestant Pastor Ilmurad Nurliev, who had been falsely accused of 'swindling' more than US $2.4 million from church members (despite Turkmenistan being one of the poorest countries in the world -- see RLPB 072) was convicted and jailed for four years. Forum 18 reports: 'Judge Agajan Akjaev of Mary Town Court in south-eastern Turkmenistan ruled that Nurliev will serve his sentence in the general regime labour camp in Seydi.' The court also ordered that Pastor Nurliev undergo forced treatment for an alleged drug addiction. As Forum 18 notes, reports indicate that prisoners at the Seydi camp are routinely 'treated' with psychotropic (mind-altering) drugs. An American diplomat who travelled from the capital, Ashgabat, to Mary to observe the trial was refused entry. As noted in RLPB 072, the religious liberty situation in Turkmenistan has deteriorated dramatically.


OCTOBER 2010 ROUND-UP
-- also this month . . .

* EGYPT: SERIOUS INCITEMENT AGAINST COPTIC CHRISTIANS ESCALATES


Persecution is escalating against Egypt's Christians -- particularly the indigenous (non-Arab) Copts -- as the government implements Sharia provisions that prohibit Christians from testifying against Muslims, enabling radicalised Muslims to assault, rob and even kill Christians with impunity. In May 2010 Youssef Ibrahim (a New York Sun reporter) claimed President Mubarak had brokered a quid pro quo deal with the Muslim Brotherhood: they would accept dynastic succession of power to Mubarak's son, Gamal, in exchange for freedom to advance Sharia (Islamic law) as well as restore over the Copts the rules of dhimmitude (i.e. accept subjugation or face jihad).

On 15 September Muhammad Salim al-Awwa, former secretary-general of the International Union for Muslim Scholars, raged against Egypt's minority Copts on Aljazeera TV, falsely accusing them of planning a coup against the Muslims. He claimed the Copts were importing weapons from Israel which were being stockpiled in churches. Equally ridiculous was his claim that Egypt's security forces are unable to gain access to churches and monasteries to investigate. At the same time, Islamic inciters are spreading rumours that the Coptic Church is kidnapping converts to Islam and whisking them away to desert monasteries where they are tortured back to Christianity -- the exact opposite of what actually happens. (Muslim converts to Christianity have been kidnapped and tortured to revert.) Muslims have staged at least ten mass demonstrations since September with calls to massacre the Copts. Muslim demonstrators burned an effigy of Coptic Pope Shenouda (86) on 8 October while chanting, 'Shenouda, just wait, we will dig your grave with our own hands.' As incitement escalates and genocidal violence looms, the government of President Hosni Mubarak remains totally silent. The situation is extremely dangerous. Please pray for God to intervene, drawing the Copts into prayerful dependence and then answering their prayers for the glory of his own holy name. (Isaiah 37:20.)

* NIGERIA: AL-QAEDA SUPPORTS BOKO HARAM EXPANSION


According to terrorism analyst Yossef Bodansky (Strategic Policy 8, 2010), in-mid June 2010 Boko Haram ('the Nigerian Taliban') formalised its links with al-Qaeda of the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM). Bodansky also reported that AQIM is receiving aid and intelligence from Sudan and Iran 'who are operating jointly in the Sahel'. AQIM leader Abu Mousab Abdel Wadoud asserts that the international jihadist movement will assist Boko Haram with weapons and training to enable al-Qaeda to gain 'strategic depth' in sub-Saharan Africa and the solid foothold in Nigeria required for operations in West Africa.

Boko Haram jihadists attacked a federal prison in Bauchi in September 2010, freeing about 750 inmates, including numerous imprisoned sect members. A spate of attacks over recent weeks, targeting police officers, politicians and traditional leaders in the city of Maiduguri, has forced Nigerian security forces to escalate their efforts against Boko Haram. On Sunday 24 October, Boko Haram jihadists attacked the police station in the town of Bara in the northern state of Yobe. The AQIM link could lead to the emergence of 'spectacular terrorism' al-Qaeda-style -- such as suicide-bombings -- hitherto unknown in Nigeria. Boko Haram has been behind most outbreaks of mass violence against Christians in the north since 2004. Please pray for the Church in Nigeria as Boko Haram's new relationship with AQIM does not bode well.

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

078. Central Asia: Christianity's past and present

Religious Liberty Prayer Bulletin | RLPB 078 | Wed 20 Oct 2010

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CENTRAL ASIA: CHRISTIANITY'S PAST AND PRESENT
By Anneta Vyssotskaia
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The Central Asian region is a vast territory including five countries which were once part of the former USSR: Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan. In ancient times it was inhabited mainly by nomadic tribes and was an important part of the Great Silk Road, which played a big role in the historical and cultural development of this region. The total population of Central Asia exceeds 60 million, the majority of whom are Sunni Muslims, and includes over 100 ethnic groups. In the Soviet period about 25 percent of the population were Russians but after the collapse of the Soviet Union the majority of the Russian population migrated out of this region. However, many Central Asian people still use the Russian language for international communication.

Christianity came to Central Asia from Persia in the 1st Century. According to legend, the Apostle Thomas went to Samarkand (now a city in Uzbekistan) by the Great Silk Road and appointed several bishops there. Documents confirmed that in the 2nd & 3rd Centuries there were Christian churches in that region and Christianity spread mainly through Nestorian Christians. However, around the 14th Century Christianity started to be wiped out by Islam and Buddhism and practically disappeared for several centuries. A new stage of Christianity started about mid-19th Century with the arrival of the Russian Orthodox Church and Russian farmer migrants. Russian Orthodox churches were built in all Russian settlements. At the end of the 19th Century many evangelical Christians came to the region, often as a result of persecution. Although the local population was quite tolerant of both Orthodox and evangelical Christians, Christianity was still considered the religion of the non-ethnic people.

During the Soviet period all religions were controlled and persecuted by the state authorities and several generations grew up as atheists. The end of the Soviet regime brought many freedoms to the people including the freedom of religion. It opened the door to numerous missionaries and resulted in many new churches of different denominations. Masses of people were attracted to the churches. However, very soon active support of traditional national religions started and also resistance to missionary activities. Islam became more active. The religious freedom and openness gradually were replaced by restrictions. The governments supported certain religions and denominations while resisting the activities of others, especially foreign missionaries and 'non-traditional' religions. This was partly an attempt to use certain religious teaching as an ideological basis for the whole population and partly to reduce the threat of destabilisation and ethnic conflicts in their countries. The next step was to amend existing laws to impose legislative restrictions, especially regarding sharing faith with other people, children's work and even religious education of church members.

According to Open Doors World Watch List, four out of the five Central Asian countries are included in the list of 50 countries where Christians are persecuted for their faith: Uzbekistan (10th), Turkmenistan (15th), Tajikistan (32), Kyrgyzstan (49).

In an environment where ethnic conflicts can be easily ignited, Central Asia churches suffer the problem that these conflicts may cause divisions and bitterness even amongst Christians.

The overall picture in Central Asia is the Church has to survive and grow in circumstances of persecution, ethnic conflicts and economic hardship. Study materials are lacking in the local languages, which is a hindrance to discipleship especially in remote places. In Uzbekistan, it is especially difficult as Christian literature is searched for, confiscated and destroyed by police, and church members get detained and fined on a massive scale. It is now an impossible task to get a church registered, but even registration no longer protects a church from police raids and detention of its members.

Christianity in Central Asia has to walk a long and narrow path to growth, despite all the restrictions and difficulties imposed by state and religious authorities, as well as pressure from the predominantly Muslim society.

A believer in Uzbekistan says, 'I continue to live by the power of the One Who has loved me.' This was just written by the wife of a pastor serving his fourth year in prison for his Christian faith.


PRAISE GOD FOR:

* the spiritual revival in Central Asia following the collapse of the Soviet Union.

* Church growth across Central Asia despite growing restrictions on religious freedom and severe persecution in many places, praying that he will protect and strengthen his Church.

* faithfulness and boldness of Christian leaders who set a good example to the believers in their churches.


PLEASE PRAY SPECIFICALLY THAT GOD WILL:

* enable his children to fulfil his Great Commandment of making disciples in all nations and all remote places, and that there will be enough material in their languages so every believer might study the Word of God in all its fullness.

* help and provide for many needy Christians living in this region of great poverty and unemployment.

* help his children of different nationalities to be united amidst all ethnic conflicts and be instruments of his peace.

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SUMMARY TO USE IN BULLETINS UNABLE TO RUN THE WHOLE ARTICLE
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THE CHURCH'S STRUGGLE IN CENTRAL ASIA

The Church in the former Soviet countries of Central Asia -- Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan -- struggles for survival and growth amidst persecution, ethnic conflicts and economic hardship. Lack of material in the local languages hinders discipleship training. This is especially a problem in Uzbekistan where the police search for Christian literature, seize and destroy it, as well as detain and fine church members on a massive scale. It is now impossible to get a church registered, but even registration no longer protects a church from police raids and detention of its members. Please pray for the Church in Central Asia on its long and narrow path to growth, despite all the restrictions and difficulties imposed by state and religious authorities, as well as pressure from the predominantly Muslim society.

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

077. Updates: Algeria, India, Somalia, Indonesia

Religious Liberty Prayer Bulletin | RLPB 077 | Wed 13 Oct 2010

Due to an urgent and time-consuming family health situation that has just arisen, Elizabeth Kendal, our regular religious liberty monitor, analyst and writer, has not been able to compile this week's Bulletin. An alternative contributor happened to be travelling internationally and likewise has been unable to assist.

We believe therefore what would be most helpful in these circumstances is to provide a reminder of situations we have prayed for, which have not gone away since the week we particularly highlighted them. Our sisters and brothers suffering for their faith in Christ will still value our continued support and remembrance in prayer before God's throne of grace.

Some more information and helpful links are also available on Elizabeth Kendal's blog 'Religious Liberty Monitoring'.

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* ALGERIA (RLPB 076 | 06 Oct 2010 - Society Protests Islamisation as Christians Face Court)

It appears the trial of Pastor Yahou Mahmoud and three elders scheduled for 10 October has been postponed again - it had already been postponed twice. They are accused of 'practising non-Muslim worship without authorisation', even though their Protestant Church of Algeria is a nationally accredited denomination with 30,000 believers. Mahmoud is to be tried additionally on a charge of 'hosting a foreigner' - a French pastor. Algerian society generally is supporting Christians in these and other trials because of their concern about Islamists advancing Islamisation in Algeria. The country and its Church needs our prayers.

* INDIA (Included in RLPB 075 | 29 Sep 2010 - September Update; RLPB 062 | 30 Jun 2010 - June Update)

Hindu militants' repression and persecution of the Church in India continues to grow. Christian leaders - especially pastors - are constantly threatened and often spuriously detained and even imprisoned. Believers are attacked and churches and their Bibles, equipment and furniture are trashed. The Evangelical Fellowship of India has recorded 106 major incidents this year (up to August) - that's an average of three every week - in 16 States, including 37 in Karnataka.

* SOMALIA (RLPB 074 | 22 Sep 2010 - Islamic Terror Surges)

Having captured most of southern and central Somalia, Islamic jihadists are now fighting to control the capital Mogadishu. Al-Shabab, the most radical and aggressive of the insurgent groups, is systematically targeting the Church for elimination. Some 20 Christians, mostly church leaders, have been shot or beheaded by al-Shabab over the past two years. On 21 July al-Shabab militants shot dead long-time Christian, Osman Abdullah Fataho, in his home in front of his wife and children. Fataho was targeted because he was an apostate (convert from Islam) and active in Somalia's underground church. The jihadists abducted Fataho's family, later releasing his wife but keeping her four children aged 5 to 15 to be trained as jihadists. Please pray for this family and for the Church in Somalia.

* BEKASI, INDONESIA
(RLPB 073 | 13 Sep 2010 - Threat Level Rises; included in RLPB 070 | 25 Aug 2010 - August Update; RLPB 068 | 11 Aug 2010 - Worshippers Attacked; included in RLPB 066 | 28 Jul 2010 - July Update; RLPB 063 | 07 Jul 2010 - Jihad Threat Level High)

The threat level facing Christians in Bekasi Regency, West Java, has been rising continuously since 27 June when Bekasi's Islamic leaders publicly denounced 'Christianisation' of Bekasi (98 percent Muslim) and urged Bekasi Muslims to prepare for jihad. Christians have since been threatened with death and physically attacked during, or on their way to, worship, some so severely they have had to be hospitalised in a critical condition.

Wednesday, October 6, 2010

076. Algeria: society protests Islamisation as Christians face court

Religious Liberty Prayer Bulletin | RLPB 076 | Wed 06 Oct 2010

ALGERIA: SOCIETY PROTESTS ISLAMISATION AS CHRISTIANS FACE COURT

As in many emerging Muslim democracies, hard-line Islamic fundamentalists in Algeria have secured the balance of power and are emerging as skilful politicians and experts in the art of quid pro quo. Armed with their Qur'ans, they play the religion card for political gain. Armed with threats of destabilising violence, riots and strikes, they influence policy and dictate the agenda. However, decades of horrific Islamic terror have left many Algerians traumatised and profoundly disillusioned. Further to this, an awakening of Berber identity -- especially in the Kabylie region east of Algiers -- has seen a revival of indigenous language, culture and history, and increasingly a rejection of Arab and Islamic imperialism. Christianity is growing, especially in the Kabylie region, attracting the attention of the Islamists. While persecution has escalated, the Church is not alone, for many Kabylie citizens and rights groups are equally concerned about advancing Islamisation, declining liberty, escalating intolerance and state repression. A new struggle for Algeria is heating up.

On 12 August two construction workers, Hocine Hocini (44) and Salem Fellak (34), both recent converts from Islam, were arrested during their lunch break and charged with 'non-compliance with a precept of Islam' (a highly controversial article in Algeria's penal code) for eating during daylight hours in Ramadan. On 21 September the prosecutor in the court of Ain el-Hammam, a town in the region of Tizi Ouzou in Kabylie, requested that the men receive three years in prison. When Hocine Hocini informed the court he was a 'Protestant Christian' and not a Muslim, the prosecutor counselled him 'to leave this country, a land of Islam'. Outside the courthouse, hundreds of demonstrators -- including atheists, liberal Muslims, intellectuals, rights activists and members of the movement for the autonomy of Kabylie -- stood in solidarity with hymn-singing Christians to protest 'arbitrary use of power'. On 5 October, as hundreds waited outside the courthouse again, the court handed down its verdict acquitting both men. Many saw this as a victory for solidarity. Doubtless God was answering prayers, for a guilty verdict would have had horrendous ramifications.

It will be interesting to see how the Islamic fundamentalists respond. A similar case against eight Muslims accused of violating Ramadan in Bejaia (also in Kabylie) will take place on 8 November. This case has caused such an outcry it has been postponed twice already. According to a 2009 poll, 36 percent of Algerians fast during Ramadan only 'occasionally', while seven percent do not fast at all. As one Algerian business executive noted, 20 years ago all the restaurants of downtown Algiers would stay open right through Ramadan.

In a case in Larbaa-Nath-Irathen (once again in the Kabylie region), four Protestant leaders will face court on charges of 'practising non-Muslim worship without authorisation'. Already twice postponed, this trial is now set for 10 October. The fellowship led by Pastor Yahou Mahmoud and elders Raid Abdenour, Mokrani Nacer and Haouedj Idir is affiliated with the Protestant Church of Algeria (EPA), a nationally accredited denomination with some 30,000 believers, mainly in Kabylie. Pastor Yahou Mahmoud, who owns the property where the church meets, will also be tried for 'hosting a foreigner' (a French pastor). Many Algerian Christians believe the Islamists are aiming to drive them either into dhimmitude (subjection) or out of Algeria. The President of the EPA, Pastor Mustapha Krim, is appealing for an end to these abuses.

PRAISE GOD FOR:

* the court's courage in upholding justice and acquitting Hocine Hocini and Salem Fellak, doubtless despite government and Islamist pressure.

PLEASE PRAY SPECIFICALLY THAT GOD WILL:

* work all things together for good for the benefit of the Church and the glory of his name, including the public witness of Algeria's persecuted Christians, the growing desire of Algerians for liberty and the growing social solidarity.

* be profoundly present during the 10 October trial of Protestant leaders Yahou Mahmoud, Raid Abdenour, Mokrani Nacer and Haouedj Idir; may they trust in God as their refuge and strength. May the Holy Spirit both give and bless the words they speak before the court, the media and the masses. (Matthew 10:16-20.)

* continue to bless the gospel radio and satellite ministries that have been so effective in bringing spiritual liberty, peace, hope and transformation to many disillusioned Algerians; may God provide all their needs, and protect them from attacks.

* grant wisdom and justice for Ali Arhab, head of France-based Chanel North Africa, against whom Algeria has issued a nation-wide arrest warrant.


SUMMARY TO USE IN BULLETINS UNABLE TO RUN THE WHOLE ARTICLE
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SOCIETY PROTESTS ISLAMISATION IN ALGERIA AS CHRISTIANS FACE COURT

On 5 October a court in the Kabylie region east of Algiers acquitted Christian converts Hocine Hocini and Salem Fellak of the charge of 'non-compliance with a precept of Islam'. They had been arrested for eating lunch during Ramadan. During this and an earlier trial, hundreds of concerned citizens and civil society groups stood alongside Christians in a display of public solidarity to protest growing intolerance and abuse of power. On 10 October four Protestant leaders will face court, charged with 'practising non-Muslim worship without authorisation'. The fellowship led by Pastor Yahou Mahmoud and elders Raid Abdenour, Mokrani Nacer and Haouedj Idir is affiliated with the Protestant Church of Algeria, a large nationally accredited denomination. The struggle for Algeria is heating up. Please pray for its Church.